434 Fayetteville St #2030
Raleigh, NC 27601

Medical Marijuana in North Carolina

Despite the fact that more than half the states in the nation have legalized cannabis for medicinal or even recreational purposes, marijuana remains classified as a Schedule VI controlled substance in North Carolina and is largely illegal to possess. The North Carolina Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act was passed in 2014 and amended in 2015, but it only allows patients diagnosed by neurologists with intractable epilepsy to legally possess a hemp extract.

Medical marijuana, however, has proven beneficial for people suffering from many other debilitating conditions, such as cancer, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), glaucoma, seizures, and several others. Visitors who have been legally prescribed medical marijuana in their home states can often be surprised to learn that possession of even a small amount of cannabis can result in criminal charges in North Carolina.

Lawyer Discusses Medical Marijuana in North Carolina

Were you recently arrested in the Research Triangle area for any kind of alleged marijuana offense despite you needing the cannabis for a medical condition? The Coolidge Law Firm will fight to protect your rights and work to possibly get the criminal charges reduced or dismissed.

Raleigh criminal defense attorney David Coolidge represents individuals accused of marijuana offenses throughout Wake County, including Knightdale, Apex, Cary, Fuquay-Varina, Garner, and Holly Springs as well as students at such local higher learning institutions as Shaw University, Duke University, Meredith College, and North Carolina State University. You can have our lawyer provide an honest and thorough evaluation of your case as soon as you call (919) 239-8448 to schedule a free initial consultation.


Raleigh Medical Marijuana Information Center


Back to top

Medical Marijuana Legislation in Wake County

In 2014, then-Governor Pat McCrory signed the North Carolina Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act into law. The law was amended the following year to allow people diagnosed by neurologists with intractable epilepsy to use hemp extract as an alternative treatment for intractable epilepsy without participating in a pilot study.

The law defines a hemp extract as meaning “an extract from a cannabis plant, or a mixture or preparation containing cannabis plant material, that has all of the following characteristics”:

In addition to only making a limited number of people available to be qualifying patients, the law encouraged certain local universities to “conduct research on hemp extract development, production, and use for the treatment of seizure disorders and to participate in any ongoing or future clinical studies or trials” but generally required hemp extract to be acquired form another jurisdiction. Representative Kelly Alexander introduced House Bill 78 (HB 78), which sought to expand the number of conditions eligible for medical marijuana, but the House Judiciary Committee reported the bill unfavorably and it received no further consideration.

In April 2016, House Bill 983 (HB 983) was introduced and would allow individuals to possess or use marijuana or THC without being subject to the penalties described in the North Carolina Controlled Substances Act, if that individual satisfies all of the following criteria:

HB 983 passed on the first reading and was referred to the House Health Committee. It would need to pass there before moving on to the full House for further consideration.


Back to top

Marijuana Penalties in Raleigh

Unfortunately, people with medical conditions who are currently unapproved for hemp extract can face criminal penalties for possession of any amount of cannabis. If a person allegedly possesses more than 10 pounds of cannabis, it can result in trafficking of marijuana charges.

Marijuana possession is punishable as follows in North Carolina, depending on the amount allegedly possessed:

If a person is accused of cultivating or growing cannabis, that individual can be charged with manufacturing marijuana under North Carolina General Statute § 90-95(a)(1). If the amount involved is 10 pounds or less, the alleged crime is a Class I felony, but any excess amount results in the trafficking charges listed above.


Back to top

North Carolina Resources for Medical Marijuana

North Carolina Cannabis Patients Network (NCCPN) — NCCPN is a nonprofit organization with the mission “to represent the patients of the state of North Carolina who use cannabis as medicine, their families, caregivers and medical professionals.” Visit this website to read recent news, participate in forums, and learn more about different NCCPN chapters in the state. You can also find various downloadable material as well as information on upcoming events.

House Bill 766 | North Carolina General Assembly — Read the full text of the bill state legislators passed to amend the North Carolina Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act. Governor McCrory signed this hemp extract bill into law on July 16, 2015. You can view all of the changes that were made to the original law, including an increase in the allowable amount of THC and decrease in the required amount of cannabidiol.


Back to top

The Coolidge Law Firm | Raleigh Medical Marijuana Defense Attorney

If you were arrested for any kind of cannabis-related offense despite you needing marijuana for a medical condition, it will be in your best interest to immediately retain legal counsel. The Coolidge Law Firm defends clients in Zebulon, Morrisville, Raleigh, Rolesville, Wake Forest, Wendell, and many surrounding areas of Wake County.

David Coolidge and his Associates are experienced criminal defense lawyers in Raleigh who also helps students at such local colleges as North Carolina State Univerity (NCSU), William Peace University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Wake Technical Community College (Wake Tech). Call (919) 239-8448 or complete an online contact form today to have our attorney review your case and discuss your legal options during a free, confidential consultation.


Back to top

Pay Online
credit cards icons Click to Hire Us Now
Our Office Location
office building
Coolidge Law Firm
BB&T Building
434 Fayetteville St.
Suite 2030
Raleigh, NC 27601
Map · Directions
Explore Our Website
Our Attorney and Staff
David Coolidge
David A. Coolidge
is heading up our team as criminal defense attorney and graduate at the top of his class from Duke University School of Law ...
Read More
Steven MacGilvray
Steven P. MacGilvray
Steven P. MacGilvray is an Associate Attorney at Coolidge Law Firm, focusing primarily on Criminal Defense. Mr. MacGilvray graduated from Regent University School of Law ...
Read More
Brent Blakesley
Brent Blakesley
manages the daily operations at Coolidge Law Firm. Brent graduated from Duke University in 2008 with a BA in Computer Science, BA in Linguistics ...
Read More